March 22nd, 2013

Open Source Guilt & Passion

I was on In Beta a while ago, and we talked about the “guilt” that comes with maintaining open source projects. I feel both intensely passionate and exceptionally guilty with how I contribute to open source. I love getting patches into new projects, and the needs of existing projects are demanding.

An open source contributor doesn’t feel guilt as in a crime, but guilt as in time: What is best to spend your yours on? Razvan Onofrei has a strategy for dealing with a limited amount of time. He explained a lot of things. He talked about his fascination with letters and words and why he especially liked them when they showed up on:

The basic idea is this: you try to minimize the things that are bad, and maximize those that are good.

I was intrigued by some of the designs so I asked him about the history of some of the pieces. Jamie is the kind of guy who turns a quick ten second question into a slow ten minute answer. That was fine by me, I had nowhere else to be.

He explained a lot of things. He talked about his fascination with letters and words and why he especially liked them when they showed up on Navajo rugs. He also talked a bit about crazy quilts, another one of his obsessions. I was on In Beta a while ago, and we talked about the “guilt” that comes with maintaining open source projects.

I feel both intensely passionate and exceptionally guilty with how I contribute to open source. I love getting patches into new projects, and the needs of existing projects are demanding.

  1. Short, thoughtful and insightful post. Something that will stay with people. Also, easy to read with the new design. Loving this new experience.

  2. Well written and thought provoking. Nobody is perfect. What good does it do to try to appear like you are. What is more important is how you learn from it moving forward.

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